Kudos for Keefer's No-Nonsense Approach

We recently posted on our Web site an excerpt from an article by Publisher Emeritus Frank Keefer, entitled "Interviewing Vs. Recruiting," along with a link for the complete article. The posting prompted an unusually large response from our readership. Here is the excerpt, along with a few representative responses.

"'The competition is fierce! Only about one in five is invited back for a second interview. Successful candidates continue the process for another five or six interviews. This is followed by a probationary period during which the candidate must demonstrate his ability to successfully move product. The prize? Earnings of $100,000 a year within 12 months....'

"Sound like the interview process for a job as an IBM corporate executive? It could be--but it's the process I've used to successfully build a dynamic network marketing sales organization. Successful duplication of this process has created more million-dollar earners, more high pin levels (based on earnings), more full-time distributors, and a higher revenue base for the company in a shorter period of time than any of my peers. I don't believe this is about me; it's about posture. It's about teaching leadership and instilling the belief that we have the 'cookie' and don't need to beg people to come into our program...."

(Read the entire article: http://www.networkingtimes.com/fk)

Without being strong enough to step away from a time-sucker and go find someone who is hungry for life, you are wasting his and, most importantly, your time.

Having been in network marketing for many years, I find that Frank Keefer's straightforward approach is key. I've used all the methods he speaks of, but failed in the primary one: the "willingness to take it away." Without being strong enough to step away from a time-sucker and go find someone who is hungry for life, you are wasting his and, most importantly, your time. Thanks, Frank, for your insight and the guts to tell it as it is!

-- Landon Allen

Brilliant! And Frank's absolutely right: the attrition rate--i.e., failure rate--in conventional network marketing is simply unacceptable, and is one of the biggest reasons the business has such a poor image. Can you imagine any other profession living with a failure rate of 90 to 95 percent? Not likely: they'd go out of business! So why do so many of us persist in an "all-out massive action" policy that so often sets people up for failure, because they're being brought into the business in the wrong way, for the wrong reasons?

I've been in networking for about five years; having discovered Keefer's article a few months ago, I'm only now starting to work Frank's plan. It's slower, because it's all about selective, responsible, ethical sponsoring--but in the end, it has to be better than what I've been taught to do in the past.

The article should be required reading for anybody in or about to join this incredible profession. Please, give us more Frank Keefer.

-- Bryn Heapy

Writer's Guidelines?

I'm a management trainer and freelance writer, and would love to offer you an article. Possible topics: "The Power of Optimism"; "How to Say No and Get Your Life Back"; "The Six Skills of Influence." Could you send me your writer's guidelines?

-- Pam Thorne

We are always eager and open for article submissions. We have no formally published guidelines, and simply assess submissions on a case by case basis. Our editorials policies are simply that articles do not promote (or mention, for that matter) specific companies or opportunities, and are selected for their broad usefulness to our readers. A "Department" column is typically 850 to 900 words. Address any submissions to: editors@networkingtimes.com.

I was so sorry to hear of the loss of Upline and Network Marketing Lifestyles. They were fantastic magazines. The up side is a new magazine, which will without doubt be the best.

Phoenix from the Ashes

Dear John Milton Fogg:

I was so sorry to hear of the loss of Upline and Network Marketing Lifestyles. They were fantastic magazines; what a shame that so many years of hard work and dedication have been lost.

The up side is a new magazine, which will without doubt be the best, as were your other ones. I am so glad you have taken on the huge job again, and I hope you will also find the time freedom that you have worked so hard for. Wishing you and your new magazine the very best in success

-- Wanda Hamilton

John Milton Fogg replies:

Wanda, thanks for your good wishes. Please know that the "many years of hard work and dedication" you spoke of can never be lost. We've all grown through the challenges and come out stronger, smarter and even more willing to serve than ever before. The good that you get from Networking Times is evidence of that.

And Wanda, although I'm personally and professionally grateful for your acknowledgement of me, we need to spread it around. Chris and Josephine Gross started this magazine. Without their vision, commitment and sacrifice, it would not be. John David Mann edits it all; he deserves the praise. And there are many other men and women who work their heads and hearts out for each issue. Check out the masthead for a "Who's Who" of Networking Times. They are each and all a fantastic group of dedicated servant leaders.

I appreciate you! -- JMF

I love the fact that this is not about ads or paid endorsements--it's about the meat and potatoes that are left out in this wonderful industry, it is about people helping people...the give without the take!

Love Letters

I've found the articles in your publication very helpful; in fact, they have renewed my great interest in network marketing. Thank you for writing such great articles--and for sharing them!

-- Sharon K. Hubbard

I recently subscribed to the six-month Internet subscription and I love it! All of you are doing an awesome job at Networking Times. I love the fact that this is not about ads or paid endorsements--it's about the meat and potatoes that are left out in this wonderful industry, it is about people helping people...the give without the take! We should all be so wise and become givers. Keep up the good work; I look forward to receiving this for many years to come.

-- Jude Hodge