PERSPECTIVES
The Feminine Century
Networking Times' co-founder Josephine Gross, Ph.D., celebrates those feminine qualities that are the heart and soul of networking.

Books of Note * Letters * News to Use
Mini-reviews of Dare to Change Your Job, by Carole Kanchier, Ph.D. and How I Raised Myself From Failure to Success in Selling, by Frank Bettger * "Do you take article submissions from free-lancers and readers?" * Trends and signs of these networking times

Our Times
A panel of four guest editors on the question, "It's a business--what's love got to do with it?"

LEADERSHIP
A Challenge to Leadership
Jackie Ulmer
Three modes of negative communication are still all too common among networkers, and they threaten the health of our business: over-zealous exaggerations, hyperbole and impossible promises; aggressive competition-bashing; and a "self-righteous, holier-than-thou attitude directed at those who decline our opportunity." Warns Ulmer, "Evaluate every action that you take publicly that represents network marketing."

GREATEST NETWORKER
Are You Successful?
John Milton Fogg
However you define success, there is a universal definition that will help you achieve it, says Fogg. Success is a three-legged stool; with any one leg missing, it will not support your weight. The three legs are: the pursuit of excellence, the pursuit of personal growth, and the pursuit of happiness.

COACHING
Start with TeleCoaching Calls
Sonia Stringer
Creating a year-long program of weekly telecoaching calls is a powerful way to leverage your own efforts. Stringer provides a four-part blueprint for a successful call strategy: recognition; locate the challenge; brainstorm the solution; end with a clear commitment.

MINDSET
Are You Selling or Serving?
Terri Levine
Everyone knows that people are turned off by "pushy" salespeople who blatantly coerce or manipulate. But this also happens even when the sense of pressure is so subtle that neither person is consciously aware of it. Why? Because it's not your behavior people react to--it's your underlying beliefs.

PROSPECTING
How To Be a Talent Scout--Not a Recruiter
Sue Seward
Sue Seward started out as a true Knight of the Three-Foot Rule. "It was a disaster," she reports--and a learning experience. Recruiters rarely take the time to know people; their efforts don't last. Insead, start looking for the right people--and you'll be amazed at the people who start to seek you out.

PERSONAL GROWTH
When Elephants Grow Up
Bob Ford
"Daydreams are revelations of your true potential," says Ford. But the level of commitment it takes to realize those dreams is possible only when our belief in the dream is stronger than our negative conditioning. Ford offers a primer at uprooting conditioned disbeliefs.

ABUNDANCE
Do Something!
Teresa Romain Do you procrastinate? When you don't have the time to do a complete task, do you put it off, unwilling to do it only half-way? Do you get so overwhelmed by the enormity of a set of tasks that it feels easier to simply do nothing? You may be victim of the dreaded "all-or-nothing" syndrome.

LEAD STORY
Everyday Grace
John Milton Fogg
Author of such bestsellers as A Return to Love and A Woman's Worth, Marianne Williamson is widely known for her ability to capture spiritual truths in direct, accessible language. Williamson sees us as being on the threshold of the "great spiritual awakening of America"--and she feels an urgency around our making that quantum step happen. We have gone, says Williamson, from a generation "that dabbled in spiritual abstractions to one who desperately needs to apply that spirituality in very real, practical ways. ... The worldview that dominated the West in the 20th century was one centered on material worth. We allowed a now-obsolete scientific perspective--a mechanistic, rationalistic, left-brained perspective--to convince us that the material world was more important than perhaps it is. The Western mind is oversecularized and arrogant: our humbling before God is way overdue--and it's also our salvation." As individuals, we are already doing so much that is right and on a positive path, asserts Williamson; the need now is to act on that greater spiritual awareness in our collective experience.

THE NT INTERVIEW
Changing Beliefs
By John Milton Fogg
"It's not what happens to you that shapes your life--it's what you come to believe about what happens to you." Evans has been an educator, counselor, trainer and administrator of church groups, sales trainings, prison programs, and Twelve-Step recovery programs. In her work, she observed that when people go through an especially difficult time, they create beliefs that come to form their reality. Her book Travelling Free is a practical treatise on how to escape the self-limiting shackles of those inadvertently adopted false beliefs and begin to realize your full potential.

THE HEART OF BUSINESS
Kathy Coffey Finds the Feminine Principle
A single mom, Kathy Coffey was a successful network marketer--but soon found she just couldn't keep slogging away in the alpha-male mode she'd learned. Broke and burnt out, she found a company she seemed to resonate with--and a way of working the business that "honored her feminine voice."

MASTER NETWORKER
Hannah Ineson: You Have to Reinvent Yourself!
Hannah Ineson rode a wild ride as her company soared from humble beginnings to massive growth--and shrank back to its pre-boom dimensions. Through it all, Hannah has been a careful student of the business. Now in her 15th year with that same company, Hannah is more excited about the business than ever.

PROFILES
Linda Locke: A Network for Networking Women
When she entered the brave new online world in 1995, Linda Locke went hunting for a support community for network marketing women--and couldn't find one. A journalist, she started a print newsletter, which eventually became MLM Woman, an online training and support community for networking women.

PROFILES
Ann Houghteling: The Advantage of Being a Woman
Ann Houghteling's career as a high school teacher was rewarding and satisfying--and it didn't pay enough. She jumped into real estate and was successful for nearly two decades--but now there was no time for family. Was it possible to have it all--flexible time, financial success, fulfilling work? You already know the answer.

PRESENTATION
The Perfect Four-Minute Presentation
Steve Siebold
Sooner or later, every networker confronts the same situation: it's time to talk to that "cold" market. After a brief four-point primer on how to make the right impression (dress professionally, be on time, be a professional, be brief), Siebold offers a time-tested blue-print for a simple, professional, powerful presentation.

NETWORKING
"We Might Be Able To Make Some Money Together..."
Bob Burg "It's one thing to get the referral--it's quite another to successfully set the appointment with the person to whom you were referred." And Burg is off and running, providing brilliant, practical coaching on what to say and how to say it, in ways that put your referral at ease and move the conversation forward.

MARKETING
"How Much Can I Earn?"
Tom Schreiter
"It all depends" is the most obvious answer, and correct, of course--but what does that mean? In this double-length piece, Schreiter details the various levels of involvement, what they take and what they can return, and why.

TECHNOLOGY
Fishing on the Net (Without Using One)
Cheryl Gonzalez
The secret to building on the Internet is to understand it--and most Internet marketers don't. The Internet is not fundamentally about marketing, says Gonzalez, but about fast and powerful forums for people of like mind to make connections.

THE CUSTOMER
Anyone Want to Party?
Dawn Siebold
The humble home party is a powerfully effective way to jump-start your networking business--if done effectively. The master of retail, Dawn offers ten detailed, practical Do's and Don't's for putting on effective home parties--first time, every time.

THE CLOSE
Wemen
John David Mann
How do men and women do the network marketing business differently? Are there differences you can safely generalize? Yes and no, says Mann: people are people, yet as a general observation, women make better listeners, while men like to hear themselves talk.