Don't you just love it when people tell you what can't be done?

In the early seventies I broke my back in four places and was told that if I ever walked again, I'd be a cripple - at best. I went on to become one of the top-rated sports parachutists in the world and earn a high-degree black belt in the martial arts.

A decade later I was diagnosed with a painful form of bone cancer that was causing the disintegration of my skeletal structure. I was told that within five years I'd be a pile of calcium dust in a wheel chair. Twenty years later, I'm still walking - and would probably be running if it weren't for a worn-out heart muscle, which, by the way, was supposed to cause my demise five years ago. I might sleep sixteen hours a day, but I'm still sucking oxygen.

Over a quarter of a century ago, while going through divorce, I was told I'd never get custody of my kids. Two years later I was "Single Parent of the Year."

"Those pyramid schemes never work!" Need I say more?

I've seen readers' eyeballs roll after learning the vision of Gabriel Media Group, Inc. publishers of Networking Times, is world peace and Global Prosperity Through a Philanthropic Economy.

It can't be done! A pipe dream! An impossibility!

Maybe. Maybe not.

The Realities of Life

Honestly look to yourself. Consider any issue about which you are virulently passionate. Would you compromise with someone equally passionate - but diametrically opposed to you?
I'm not blind to the realities of life. I've been involved in combat operations in Southeast Asia, Central America and South Africa. I've been to Bosnia. I was at Tiananman Square. More than most, even the cynics, I have some comprehension about what makes people tick. I recognize one of the harshest realities of life: despite what people say, few really want peace!

Grab any man, woman or child off the street of any war-torn area in the world: an Arab or Israeli in the Middle East, a Catholic or Protestant in Ireland, or a Serb or Croat in Bosnia. They'll tell you that more than anything they want peace. They'll even tell you that they pray for it.

In our own country, grab a Democrat or Republican. Within corporate America, talk with someone from management and then someone from the rank and file. They'll all tell you the same thing: they want harmony.

My experience has taught me something different.

There is no doubt that we have the greatest country in the world. We offer not just stuff, but also opportunity. We can't force our way of life on others, but we can continue to set the best example possible and improve upon what we have already accomplished.

Rephrase the question: Ask any of the above, "Would you be willing to have a shared power environment to achieve that peace or harmony?" Invariably, the answer is an emphatic no!

Are you kidding? Not on your life! I want nothing to do with those scoundrels!

Doubt this? Honestly look to yourself. Consider any issue about which you are virulently passionate. Would you compromise with someone equally passionate - but diametrically opposed to you?

Don't be too quick to say "yes."

What people really want is control. That desire is borne out of concern for the survival of our own ideals. If we give an inch, we might end up losing a mile.

How do we resolve those feelings of insecurity and paranoia? Maybe global prosperity will open the door. Maybe not. But it sure won't happen if we don't try.

There is no doubt that we have the greatest country in the world. We offer not just stuff, but also opportunity. We can't force our way of life on others, but we can continue to set the best example possible and improve upon what we have already accomplished. Others will see us and make their own choice. Maybe that choice will lead to world peace.

Don't tell me it can't be done. I don't need to puff on a pipe to have that dream.

Frank Keefer is a veteran
networker, Publisher Emeritus of Networking Times,
and author of the recent release Reflections of a Master.