Are You Making What You're Worth?

This FAQ ("frequently-asked question") joined the network marketing "Prospector's Hall of Fame" over 50 years ago. Along with "If I could show you a way..." and "Do you keep your business options open...?," it probably has been asked across more coffee shop tables and opportunity meeting aftermaths than any other. You may even have asked the question yourself - to others, and to yourself.

The Salary Wizard calculates salaries based on job title and geographic location. Next time you've got an accountant from Altoona or a secretary from Seattle in your "pipeline," you can have the financial facts at your fingertips.

So, what's your answer

You can find out online here: http://usatoday.salary.com.

The Salary Wizard at USA Today accesses salary.com's proprietary compensation database, which contains salary information on thousands of job titles. The Salary Wizard calculates salaries based on job title and geographic location.

Next time you've got an accountant from Altoona or a secretary from Seattle in your "pipeline," you can have the financial facts at your fingertips

I Do Not Like My J.O.B. (Uncle Sam I Am)

It probably comes as no surprise that only the barest majority of people really like their jobs. A recent survey by the New York-based Conference Board found that 51 percent of American workers were satisfied with their jobs. That's down from the former 59-percent finding back in 1995.

It probably comes as no surprise that only the barest majority of people really like their jobs. A recent survey found that 51 percent of American workers were satisfied with their jobs - down from 59 percent in 1995.

The mail survey conducted with 5000 participants from across the country also discovered that only one in five people were content with their employer's promotion policies and bonus plans; two out of five were happy with their earnings.

Career criticism also has something to do with where people are coming from - literally. Job satisfaction was lowest in New England, at only 44 percent, as compared to 56 percent in 2000 and 65 percent in 1995. The northern Midwest, Prairie and south central states - Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama and Mississippi - all dropped to below 50 percent.

Workers in the Rocky Mountain states were the most satisfied group, yet they dropped as well, from 63 percent to 57 percent in the past seven years.

Job satisfaction did increase with income levels, but even among higher-income households, it declined from 67 percent in 1995 to 55 percent in 2002. The most satisfied age groups were those under 25 and over 65.

Who's Got the Best Internet Portal, Search Engine and News Site?

The fine folks at ForeSee Results team up with the University of Michigan to publish a measure of American Customer Satisfaction, the ASCI Index. Recently, they took a look at the Internet to see if there was a clear winner in the Web Wars. The results:

The Best Search Engine: Google

The Best Portal: Yahoo!

The Best News Site: ABC News

The scale is 0 to 100, and to be fair, in the news category only one point separated the leader ABC (74) from MSNBC and "All others" (both 73), CNN.com (72) and the NYTimes and USAToday (71). The average score for an Internet portal was 68 and top site Yahoo! racked up an impressive 76 points, nicely ahead of Mr. Monopoly's (no opinionation there!) MSN Corporation. But in the Search Engine category, Google won by a ton with 80, over second and third Ask Jeeves (62) and Alta Vista (61).

Are You Married to Your People?

Here's some sage advice for any reader wanting to keep his or her significant other...well, significant.

"To keep your marriage brimming,
With love in the loving cup,
Whenever you're wrong, admit it;
Whenever you're right, shut up."

- Ogden Nash

Works well for business partners, too.

Not In My Back Yard (NIMBY) Syndrome

From the "You've Got To Be Kidding!" Department, this item of scientific interest:

After 20 years of study, President Bush signed a bill last July making Yucca Mountain (in the Nevada desert, 90 miles from Las Vegas) the proposed site to house 77,000 tons of unwanted nuclear waste. Since its approval, scientists, lawyers, politicians, environmental activists, and protesting citizens have been locked in heated debate and dispute over the $58 billion plan. Some say it's perfectly safe, others argue, "no way!"

One of the most "creative" solutions to the NIMBY (Not In My Back Yard) dilemma is to send all that plutonium and waste to the moon. Yup, stick the hot stuff in the warheads of intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) and shoot it to the moon where it will bury itself deep down into the sterile, glassified lunar mantle rock.

"Access to the lunar repository site by future Moon dwellers could be regulated," reports Space.com. "Retrieval, reuse, even reprocessing of the nuclear material can enhance [future] lunar operations and further deep space commerce."

So much for the moon being made of green cheese.

Great www.com Fun!

Bored with answering your e-mail? Tired of the all the manual labor involved with your auto-responders? Fried in the MLM forums? Go here: http://www.grand-illusions.com/

Grand Illusions is a digital delight. "The site for the enquiring mind, with optical illusions, scientific toys, visual effects, and even a little magic," offers a select collection of fun 'n' games, from brainteasers to optical illusions, hidden pictures, party tricks, after-images, puzzles and both on- and off-line magic.

When you need a break from your Internetwork marketing, go to Grand Illusions and you'll see some "real" spots before the eyes.