Why No Company Info?

Your recent edition with the "network marketing family" focus was enjoyable - but it would have been nice to know each family's company and the company's story, too. Why is there is so little company info in the magazine?
Just a quick note to tell you that your magazine is fantastic! Even though I was between companies, I kept up through your publication. I have to say, though, that I miss the Network Marketing Lifestyles way of intertwining a person's story with the company's story. Your recent edition with the "network marketing family" focus [issue #3] was enjoyable - but it would have been nice to know each family's company and the company's story, too. Why is there is so little company info in the magazine?

Thanks again for a "thinking" network marketing magazine.

- Cynthia L. Hun
via the Internet

In truth, it's not that we print "little" company info - we print none! It was a carefully thought-out editorial policy from day one: no company names, and no ads from network marketers, whether field or corporate. The reason: reader feedback told us the industry needs a neutral-territory, pitch-free zone where their people can read the latest industry insight, analysis and training information without even a hint of invasive competition.
- The Editors

When Will We Focus on Being Quality-and Price-Competitive?

We usually get clobbered when it comes to price comparisons unless there are companies I am not aware of that are actually price- competitive. Is it that the company wants more of the final price than is usually the role for the manufacturer or wholesaler?
We have seen network marketing deliver some great ideas and products. One of the arguments I have heard for many years is that our system of distribution is most efficient for all the reasons except being price-competitive. We usually get clobbered when it comes to price comparisons unless there are companies I am not aware of that are actually price-competitive. When I think about the real costs of product distribution, we should be able to beat every other system, but we don't. Is it that the company wants more of the final price than is usually the role for the manufacturer or wholesaler?

- Al Carlson
via the Internet

The observation– "we usually get clobbered on price" is a lot like saying, "Prospects usually say no." While it may sometimes feel like the truth to the networker in the trenches, it logically can't be: if it were, the industry wouldn't have survived and thrived for a half century, and the billion-dollar companies out there wouldn't exist.
In some specific product/service lines, many network marketing companies - and all those that are serious players in their marketplaces - are indeed price-competitive: companies offering, for example, long distance or Internet service; various forms of health, dental or other insurance; broad-spectrum buying club plans; these and others in competitive-price markets would not exist if they weren't.
Then there are the nutritional product and personal-care product companies, which offer products that are usually (almost always) higher in quality and often (though not always) in price than the supermarket or health food store counterparts. But the comparison doesn't hold up: such companies rarely even attempt to go head-to-head on a price comparison basis, simply because these are premium products that promise (and deliver) superior results.
The company isn't retaining a greater share of the dollar than any other company; they are simply offering a better product. The dollar savings is in advertising, and the advertising-marketing portion of the sales dollar is allotted to distribution: the networkers.
Customers are willing to pay the price for two reasons: one is the premium quality and results of the product; the second is the superior, person-to-person quality of the customer service.
Finally, note Dawn Siebold's column ("The Customer") this issue: she tackles the issue of price vs. value, and is right on the money.

- The Editors

No Lack of Sharp Readers, Redux

In case no one else has responded: it was Mark Twain you quoted in your article in the July/August issue. [Editor John Mann wrote in "The Close," "Can some sharp reader write in and tell me which wit it was - Mark Twain? Woody Allen? Dennis Miller? - who quipped, 'Lack of money is the root of all evil.'?".]

I really like the new journal - good luck with it! As a sometime college professor, if you are really striving for Harvard Business Review status - and you are off on a good start! - you might want to check, check, and double-check spelling and grammar. It's not the end of the world, but I did notice one spelling error (which I cannot find as I write this) in the first volume.

- Jim Welch
via the Internet

Last issue we printed a letter from Steve Norris, another reader, who had a different source for the quotation. Said Norris: "None of the above: the quotation is drawn from George Bernard Shaw."
So, who is right, Norris or Welch - Shaw or Twain? It turns out, both. Shaw's articulation of this timeless (and seemingly authorless) wisdom appeared in 1908, as part of perhaps his most famous work, Man and Superman, in the section called, "Maxims for Revolutionists," just as Norris claimed. And just 19 years later, the same words appeared, attributed to Twain, in the 1927 book More Maxims of Mark, authored by a Mr. Johnson, first name not discovered.
Okay, NOW: Can anyone write in and tell us the first name of the man who wrote More Maxims of Mark?!

- The Editors

Your Basic Love Letters

After reading and loving Network Marketing Lifestyles for years, I was so happy to come across Networking Times yesterday at Barnes & Noble! Love the style, love the content - a true network marketer's delight! Wow!

- Mary Mele
via the Internet

This is fabulous! I have been looking to get a subscription for this type of magazine and have been having no luck. I can't wait to get it!

- Pamela Strom
via the Internet

Wow - what an incredible tool for all of us in the network marketing industry! Many thanks to all who have made this possible.

- Lana Bell
via the Internet