Oh No! Low-Fat Makes People Fat!

Have another, and another. No problem. They’re “low-fat.” “Not true,” says the American Heart Association. More than 5000 low- to no-fat foods have been introduced in the past decade, and according to a paper authored by Dr. Judith Wylie-Rosett, they are in fact contributing to an “epidemic of obesity.”

People see “low-fat” and think they can eat all they want. In truth, many of these reduced-fat products contain more sugar than their “regular” counterparts—and often have more calories, too. “Too often we forget about limiting the quantity when a product is promoted as low-fat,” says Dr. Wylie-Rosett. She recommends that consumers read nutrition facts labels to compare the number of calories in each serving with the number of servings in the entire container of food. Choosing fresh produce and other fiber-rich foods allows a person to eat a large volume for relatively few calories because it promotes a feeling of fullness.

People see "low-fat" and think they can eat all they want. In truth, many of these reduced-fat products contain more sugar than their "regular" counterparts-and often have more calories, too..

The AHA recommends that people who want to lose weight and maintain their health follow the US government’s food guide pyramid, paying attention to portion sizes. About 60 percent of a person’s daily calories should come from carbohydrates, such as whole grains, fruits and vegetables. No more than 30 percent of a the daily caloric allotment should come from fat, with not more than 10 percent coming from saturated fats, found in animal products such as meat and whole-fat dairy foods. Protein-rich foods should account for about 15 percent of calories.

Source: Reuters Health. www.reuters.com

How BIG Is Your Library?

A point of pride for many thinking network marketers, especially those devoted to personal and professional growth, is their library. “A library,” said one author, “is an arsenal of liberty.” And in case your library is not yet of the size and scope you envision, fear not. As an American (and therefore, a specialist in liberty), your library is actually the largest in the world: The Library of Congress.

As an American (and, therefore, a specialist in liberty), your library is actually the largest in the world. The Library of Congress contains more than 120 million items on approximatlely 530 miles of bookshelves.

The Library of Congress contains more than 120 million items on approximately 530 miles of bookshelves. The collections include more than 18 million books, 2.5 million recordings, 12 million photographs, 4.5 million maps, and 54 million manuscripts. The Library receives some 22,000 items each working day and adds approximately 10,000 items to the collections daily. The majority of the collections are received through the Copyright registration process, as the Library is home to the U.S. Copyright Office.

Want to know about where your Library came from? Just listen:

The Library of Congress was founded in 1800, making it the oldest federal cultural institution in the nation.

On August 24, 1814, the Library’s core collection of 3000 volumes was destroyed when the British burned the Capitol, where the Library was housed.

On January 30, 1815, Congress approved the purchase of Thomas Jefferson’s personal library of 6,487 books for $23,950.

On Christmas Eve, 1851, another fire destroyed two-thirds of the collection. Many of the volumes have since been replaced, but nearly 900 are missing.

For more fascinating facts about your Library,
go to: www.loc.gov/today/fascinate

Travel: How To Get the Best Fare

David Grossman is USA Today’s Business Travel Editor. He writes a column every other week on topics of interest and concern to business travelers. Airfare bargains abound, Grossman says, if you take the time to do the research. It also helps if you can be flexible in your travel plans. Here are his six tips for getting the best (which means cheapest) airfares.

FORGET THE MILES

Airline loyalty and finding the lowest fare are mostly incompatible. In most cases, you’ll have to forget accruing those frequent-flyer miles if you want the lowest price.

PLAY THE “HUB” GAME

The availability of low airfares is all a supply-and-demand game. Many airlines will attempt to entice passengers off a non-stop competitor by offering a lower fare if you connect over one of their hubs.

VISIT A NEW AIRPORT

When a region is served by multiple airports, travelers (and airlines) often have more options for flying; the result is often lower fares. Low-priced carriers frequently select markets and airports carefully to avoid head-on collisions with the majors—making smaller, secondary airports very attractive for price-conscious travelers.

Low-priced carriers frequently select markets and airports carefully to avoid head-on collisions with the majors-making smaller, secondary airports very attractive for price-concious travelers.
TIMING IS EVERYTHING

A Saturday night stayover will reduce almost any airfare— but if this option is not available, it still pays to check alternate days and even the time of day you choose to travel.

BOOK IT YOURSELF

When you book via the Internet, the airlines save money. In order to encourage people to use the Internet and save themselves a bundle, airlines tend to offer their lowest prices on the Web, especially on their own Web sites.

READ YOUR E-MAIL

Unlike the high cost and time consumed in traditional advertising, e-mail and the Web allow airlines to advertise last-minute deals virtually cost-free. If you travel to certain destinations on a regular basis, you should sign up for as many airline e-mail programs as possible.

You can contact David Grossman at: travel@usatoday.com.

Source: USA Today. www.usatoday.com