Technology: to embrace or not to embrace?

It was not a decision I took lightly. As the daughter of network marketing legends, I had watched my parents build one of the largest world-wide dynasties in network marketing history--the old-fashioned way. Our is a business of "duplication"--not reinventing the wheel. I really had to come to terms with how I felt about embracing technology and building my business the new high-tech way.

After much soul-searching, here's what I concluded: times have changed. Most businesses are run differently today than they were back in the 20th Century. Ours is no different? In fact, I can say this with confidence: if you don't learn how to employ the latest technologies to grow and enhance your networking business, you will be left behind.
You must never lose sight of the role that high touch plays in the equation of building your business. People join your business for the money and time freedom; they stay because of the relationships.

That will never change. Your job is to learn how to most effectively use high-tech to bring people into the business--and high-touch to keep them in the business.

Call me a technology brat-- but I am truly spoiled by the efficiencies technology offers me.

I love being able to leverage my time and invite groups of people from all over the country to listen to a live teleconference call, all at the same time. When I started in this business 13 years ago, I would find myself repeating the same story over and over. Now I put my time to better use: spending my one-on-one hours with only the truly interested prospects.

I love being able to say to a new distributor, "You don't have to worry about how to close a prospect; just three-way me in and listen to me do it." In the old days, they'd have to be in the same room with me to benefit from such hands-on training. (Not very effective for training new distributors across the country.) Thanks to simple Internet marketing tools such as auto-responders and follow-up email campaigns, new distributors can get ahead even if they their follow-up skills are weak to nonexistent.

I shudder to think of the days when someone would say, "Do you have information you can mail me?"--and we would actually get in our cars and drive to the nearest post office. In today's business climate, could you imagine anyone waiting days for time-sensitive information to arrive--when it's available 24/7 on the Net?

Don't get me wrong. You must never lose sight of the role that high touch plays in the equation of building your business. People join your business for the money and time freedom; they stay because of the relationships. That will never change.

Your job is to learn how to most effectively use high-tech to bring people into the business-- and high-touch to keep them in the business.

Laura Kall is President of Gabriel Media Group, Inc.