The challenge in network marketing has never been a shortage of prospects. The challenge has always been the fact that everyone on planet earth wants to achieve big money and free time, and distributors are forced to make choices in an environment of insurmountable opportunities.

Simply put, there are too many prospects and too little time. In fact, itís so daunting that many people become overwhelmed and begin engaging in activities that are totally unproductive so that they can eventually defend their failure by pretending that they just didnít have a good upline or no one taught them how to succeed.

Others blame their companies, products or unsupportive families. Some decide to become full-time trainers (teaching others what they were themselves unable to pull off), while others form mastermind groups for the purpose of supporting each other in a comfortable, non-threatening environment in which everyone remains stuck in the "getting started" phase.

Why face rejection from prospects when we can get hugs from associates?

The problem with network marketing has always been the fact that it truly is too good to be true. Every non-networker is a prospect. So is every networker, for that matter.

Anyone can afford to buy a business kit. Nobody needs overhead. Nobody needs business experience or a college degree. The only thing everybody needs to figure out real quickly is an exit strategy in order to protect their self-esteem.

Nobody is embarrassed to admit that they arenít a surgeon because itís easy to claim lack of tuition, problems in college level chemistry, a low SAT score or the need to go to work to support a family instead of pursuing medical school.

But how do we justify failure in network marketing when our companies have great technology, unlimited income potential and no barriers to success?

One of the easiest ways to defend mediocrity or failure in networking is to pretend that itís hard to find prospects. In other words, some people reverse the truth: they pretend that the following strategiesóeach of which allowed some people to earn millionsósimply donít exist: The truth is: everyone needs your products, services and business opportunity. The only real cause of failure is amateur behavior. By that I mean engaging in activities for which no one is compensated. Professionals get paid. Amateurs donít.

Occasionally it just makes sense to ask ourselves two questions:
  1. What does my network marketing company pay me to do?
  2. Is it intelligent to participate in activities for which I am not being compensated?
Iíve been in this profession for over twenty years and I still canít believe my good fortune for having discovered it.

I have no bureaucrats bossing me around. If I want to earn $1,000 today, nobody can stop me. I can give myself a raise whenever I want to or take the day off and go fishing.

I know that wherever I go, anywhere in the world, everyone I see is a prospect because everyone wants more money and free time. I also know that itís all up to Mark Yarnell.

Nobody is ever going to hold a gun to my head and force me to recruit and retail. But there will be a thousand diversions every day that can throw me off track if I do not remain focused on those activities for which I am compensated.

As professional networkers, we are either plagued with insurmountable opportunities or weíre in the toughest business in the free market economy. Either way, itís all up to us.